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The Communication Ecology of 21st Century Urban Communities

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Edited By Yong-Chan Kim, Matthew D. Matsaganis, Holley A. Wilkin and Joo-Young Jung

The Communication Ecology of 21st Century Urban Communities addresses the questions of whether it (still) matters what neighborhood individuals live in and if it is still necessary and possible for city dwellers to build and maintain place-based communities.

The book’s contributors address how urban communities are formed, reformed, and transformed from a communication infrastructure theory perspective. Through the lens of this theory, communication is defined as a fundamental social process by which cities are sustained and changed over time. The chapters in this book elaborate the theoretical and methodological frameworks of the communication infrastructure theory approach; articulate theory-driven and multi-method frameworks for the study of the city; and speak to pressing, contemporary, research- and policy-related challenges (or questions).

The broad array of issues addressed within this volume is expected to draw the interest not only of communication researchers and professionals, but also of students, scholars, practitioners, and policymakers from a variety of backgrounds and with an interest in different aspects of life in the city, including: public health, technology, civic engagement, and urban planning and design.

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Gary Gumpert, General Editor

Cities are inherently places of communication, meeting spaces for interaction and/or observation. The nature of any communication venue is altered by social and technological circumstances and the urban environment is altered, in turn, by changes in communication patterns. We need to understand relationships among these significant forces—communication, technology, and the urban, suburban, rural environment—as they shape each other. Communication systems and urban social systems can be examined at multiple levels as scholars and planners examine interaction in public spaces, neighborhood communication patterns, and urban systems of transport.

The focus of this series is on social relationships in a swiftly changing communication environment. Media coverage of urban issues, conflict resolution and contested urban space, visual communication, rhetorical dimensions of urban life, film and the city, journalism, the ethnic press, local media and public policy are just some areas of relevance. Volumes in this series provide a forum to explore and discuss the challenges created by the intersection of communication and urban life, focusing on what communication scholarship has to offer for enhanced understanding of cities and for the development of a public policy that takes into account communication needs and practices.

For additional information about this series or the submission of manuscripts, please contact the series editor, Gary Gumpert, at listra@optonline.net.

To order other books in this series, please contact our Customer Service Department: (800) 770‐LANG (within the U.S.) (212) 647‐7706 (outside the U.S...

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