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The Communication Ecology of 21st Century Urban Communities

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Edited By Yong-Chan Kim, Matthew D. Matsaganis, Holley A. Wilkin and Joo-Young Jung

The Communication Ecology of 21st Century Urban Communities addresses the questions of whether it (still) matters what neighborhood individuals live in and if it is still necessary and possible for city dwellers to build and maintain place-based communities.

The book’s contributors address how urban communities are formed, reformed, and transformed from a communication infrastructure theory perspective. Through the lens of this theory, communication is defined as a fundamental social process by which cities are sustained and changed over time. The chapters in this book elaborate the theoretical and methodological frameworks of the communication infrastructure theory approach; articulate theory-driven and multi-method frameworks for the study of the city; and speak to pressing, contemporary, research- and policy-related challenges (or questions).

The broad array of issues addressed within this volume is expected to draw the interest not only of communication researchers and professionals, but also of students, scholars, practitioners, and policymakers from a variety of backgrounds and with an interest in different aspects of life in the city, including: public health, technology, civic engagement, and urban planning and design.

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Chapter Five: Overcoming Silence Through the Neighborhood Storytelling Network: Facing Controversy Over the Restart of the Nuclear Power Plant in the City of Kashiwazaki, Japan (Joo-Young Jung / Risa Maeda)

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CHAPTER FIVE

Overcoming Silence Through the Neighborhood Storytelling Network

Facing Controversy Over the Restart of the Nuclear Power Plant in the City of Kashiwazaki, Japan*

JOO-YOUNG JUNG

Senior Associate Professor, International Christian University

RISA MAEDA

Doctoral Candidate, International Christian University



After the March 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident caused by an earthquake and tsunami, all nuclear power plants in Japan ceased operations. Since then, the restart of nuclear plants has been an intensely debated public issue both at a national and local level. The Nuclear Regulation Authority of the central government evaluates if a plant meets post-Fukushima safety regulations, but power companies also need approval from the local government and residents before a nuclear power plant can be restarted.

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