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STEM21

Equity in Teaching and Learning to Meet Global Challenges of Standards, Engagement and Transformation

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Edited By Joy Barnes-Johnson and Janelle M. Johnson

STEM21: Equity in Teaching and Learning to Meet Global Challenges of Standards, Engagement and Transformation is designed to contribute to discourses about how STEM teaching and learning can become more equitable, serving the needs of readers across the STEM educational spectrum. STEM21 is meant to problematize the status quo educational practices of STEM stakeholders including preservice and inservice teachers, district leaders, informal educators, policy makers, and the research community. While many books are narrowly targeted either for academics or practitioners, the outcome is limited dialogue between and across those spaces. This volume weaves together field-based research, personal narrative, and education theory, while providing for reflection and discussion. STEM21: Equity in Teaching and Learning to Meet Global Challenges of Standards, Engagement and Transformation is undergirded by the principle that engaged STEM education accommodates theory and practice that is equitable, rejects deficit model thinking, and is community relevant. Equitable STEM pedagogy builds autonomous pathways to learning; creates a culture of questioning and transparency; celebrates diversity of thought, habit and culture; and embraces a social justice stance on issues of race, class, gender, environmental responsibility, health, and access to resources.

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Chapter Nine: Institutional Capacity Building for STEM Teacher Education at an Urban Commuter University (Janelle M. Johnson / Roland Schendel / Elizabeth Mcclellan Ribble / Hsiu-Ping Liu)

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CHAPTER NINE

Institutional Capacity Building for STEM Teacher Education at an Urban Commuter University

JANELLE M. JOHNSON,1 ROLAND SCHENDEL,2 ELIZABETH McCLELLAN RIBBLE,3 AND HSIU-PING LIU4

This research was supported by NSF grant #DUE-1540805



Abstract

This chapter is an outcome of research conducted under an NSF Robert Noyce Capacity Building grant during 2015–2016. With MSU Denver’s 2014 Equity Scorecard Report1 as its framework, the study’s overarching research question examined what various program stakeholders viewed as key elements of a scholarship ← 205 | 206 → program designed to serve its urban commuter population. Data were collected with stakeholder groups including university faculty, student support services providers, STEM students, Community College of Denver faculty, community-based organizations, established Noyce programs, school/district partners, students at partner secondary schools, and School of Education administrators. Each group provided detailed recommendations for the program design. This chapter specifically focuses on the voices of the university students in STEM majors, some of whom are pursuing teacher licensure.

Editorial reflections

The first time I, Joy, saw the Rocky Mountains up close was as a fellow for a AAAS Media program. Working at a local NPR station, I wrote and produced science news stories for the morning show. In 1992, the notion of “STEM” had not quite been birthed into public lexicon yet even though “Do the Right Thing” had. I sported large braids and kente-printed fabric shirts. I produced...

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