Show Less

Teachers and Students as Co-Learners

Toward a Mutual Value Theory

Series:

Dengting Boyanton

Teaching is hard. Many teachers find it stressful. New teachers often lose their enthusiasm. The special education population is skyrocketing. Students are losing their motivation. What has gone wrong? How can we create powerful learning in students? Most importantly, how can we bring joy back to the classroom? Mutual value theory, as developed by Dengting Boyanton, asserts that to generate powerful learning, four essential values must be instilled in both students and teachers:
1. self-value – both students and teachers value themselves highly
2. perceived self-value—both consider themselves to be highly valued by others
3. other-value – both value each other highly
4. course-value – both value the course highly
Since 2007, the author has applied this theory to her classroom teaching and has received overwhelmingly positive feedback. Students describe her courses as motivating, engaging, enjoyable, respectful, and empowering. Based on both theory and personal teaching experiences, Teachers and Students as Co-Learners: Toward a Mutual Value Theory will help readers develop a deeper understanding of learning, re-ignite their enthusiasm, and, most importantly, create powerful teaching and learning in the classroom.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Index

Extract

244 teachers and students as co-learners Emotional threat, 54, 69–71, 114 Engagement, 9, 14, 93–94, 97–105, 111–112, 207 Evaluation of powerful communication for a class period (f), 121 Evaluation of powerful communication for a semester (f), 122 “Expert” authority, 129 External approach, vii, xx G General self-value, 125–127 General value, 14 H Humanistic learning theory, 6 I Individual value system, 42, 130, 188–189 Information processing theory, 4 Intrapersonal intelligence, 135 L Learning disabilities, 146 Long-term memory, 4, 5 M Mastery-oriented, 130 Motivation, xix, xx, xxiii, xxv, xxvii, xxviii, 10–14, 21, 30, 44, 49–50, 87–88, 90–91, 93–96, 118, 120, 128, 134, 136–144, 147–151, 154, 159–161, 164–165, 172–174, 176–180, 185–187, 205, 211–212, 218–224 N Name game, 135 Near-sighted approach, xxi Negative labeling, 143–144 O Operant conditioning, 4, 11 “One leaf = the whole forest” approach, xxiv, xxv Over-diagnosis of learning disability, 146 Other-value, xxv, xxvii, 12–15, 30, 92, 122, 139, 160, 171–204, 227–229 P Perceived self-value, xxv, xxvii, 12–13, 15, 92, 122, 153–169, 227–229 Performance-oriented, 130 Performing self, 49–55 Physical threat, 54–59 Positional authority, 129 Potential self-value, 128, 135, 141–142, 148–152 Powerfulness, 9, 12–15, 47, 93–122, 225, 227 Psychological threat, 71–76 R Relational authority, 129 Relationship between authenticity, powerfulness, and learning (f), 116 Role model effect, 195–197, 220 Role model sharing, 91, 182 S Self-care, 50 Self-disclosure, 129...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.