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Artistic Research Methodology

Narrative, Power and the Public


Mika Hannula, Juha Suoranta and Tere Vadén

Artistic Research Methodology argues for artistic research as a context-aware and historical process that works inside-in, beginning and ending with acts committed within an artistic practice. An artistic researcher has three intertwined tasks. First, she needs to develop and perfect her own artistic skills, vision and conceptual thinking. This happens by developing a vocabulary for not only making but also writing and speaking about art. Second, an artistic researcher has to contribute to academia and the «invisible colleges» around the world by proposing an argument in the form of a thesis, a narrative; and in so doing helping to build a community of artistic research and the bodies of knowledge these communities rely on. Third, she must communicate with practicing artists and the larger public, performing what one could call «audience education». There is no way of being an engaged and committed partner in a community without taking sides, without getting entangled in issues of power. Consequently, the methodology of artistic research has to be responsive both to the requirements of the practice and the traditions of science. Here the embedded nature of the knowledge produced through artistic research becomes evident. Artistic Research Methodology is essential reading for university courses in art, art education, media and social sciences.
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9. Wolfgang Krause: A Place for Imagination—Three Projects, One Discussion, Four Annexes


Wolfgang Krause, born in 1957, studied at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts and worked as a teacher at the Weissensee Art Academy in Berlin, Germany. He has focused on interventions in public space, especially in the area of Prenzlauer Berg, since the fall of the Berlin Wall (see He has participated in various international projects in public space. He was also part of Good Life—Physical Narratives and Spatial Imaginations, Belgrade October Salon, 2012.

Mika Hannula: We will intentionally begin in a naïve way. You are sitting on a train, it’s boring. At some point, the person sitting next to you asks: What is your profession? How do you answer?

Wolfgang Krause: I make art projects.

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