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Diversity and Intersectionality

Studies in Religion, Education and Values

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Edited By Jeff Astley and Leslie J. Francis

This volume brings together two core concepts that are central to understanding the social and public significance of religions and theologies within the contemporary world and are therefore of key importance to the discipline of religious education: diversity and intersectionality. Religious diversity requires an understanding of religions and theologies and their roles within a plural society. However, the effect of the intersectionality of multiple social identities on a person’s flourishing illuminates the ways in which the broader complexity of diversity must be viewed from different perspectives.

These core constructs were brought together in a recent conference convened by the International Seminar on Religious Education and Values, the leading international association for religious educators across the world. This volume presents twelve key contributions made to the seminar, spanning both conceptual and empirical approaches, and represents a unique collection of international perspectives on the interlocking themes of intersectionality and diversity.

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7 Religion in the Lives of Socio-Economically Disadvantaged Young People: Findings of an Empirical Study in Hamburg, Germany

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ABSTRACT

From a critical perspective, this chapter aims to establish the importance of social context for the religious identity of young people. It is thus designed as a contribution to the further development of a ‘plural religious education’ (Pithan, 2009) taking account of heterogeneity that must be sensitive to the details of both the cultural and socio-economic contexts within which young people can be addressed in religious matters (Knauth, 2003, p. 353). The empirical findings presented in this chapter are based on a doctoral dissertation completed in 2013 on the role of religion in the lives of socially and economically disadvantaged young people in Hamburg, Germany (Vieregge, 2013).

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