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Teaching and Learning in the Arab World

Christina Gitsaki

In the Arab States, globalization and economic development have had a significant effect on education. Serious concerns have been expressed over the state of education in the Arab world. Even in the oil-rich Gulf States, with over 200 higher education institutions, education is problematic with a notable lack of emphasis on specialized science and innovative learning. The Gulf States are in a race to become ‘knowledge economies’ and, as a result, they are promoting educational reforms such as the application of bilingual education models and curricula adopted from the West. This book provides a collection of studies on the state of education in Arab countries with a special focus on the Arabian Gulf, where currently there is increased activity and investment in education. The book is composed of three major sections. The first section is a collection of nine papers on current practices and challenges in education in the Arab world. The second major section is devoted to the educational reforms that are being implemented in the Arabian Gulf. The third and final section is a collection of papers describing new approaches to teaching and learning in the Arab world.

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Index 467

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Index 21st Century: 206-207. Al- Ghazali: 340. Academic writing: 361, 363, 371. Accommodative approach: 238. Accomplishment: 101. Accountability: 232. Achievement: 7. Action research: 101, 383. Active interaction: 314. Active participation: 314. Advanced academic writing: 71-72, 74, 76, 83, 87. Adverbs/adverbial phrases: 450. Alienation: 131. American pop culture: 120. Analytical learning: 358. Analytical skills: 72, 74. Anglo-American model: 121. Anglo-American: 123. Arab Gulf: 122-124, 126, 128, 133. Arab learners: 444, 446-447. Arab World: 120, 122, 124, 126. Arab: 71-73, 75-76, 80, 82. Arabic culture: 120, 129, 131, 133. Arabic: 122, 124-125, 128, 133, 140, 145, 444-445, 447-449, 452-453, 454-458. Argumentation: 424, 428. Arguments: 72, 74, 80-83, 85, 86-88. Art: 315-316, 332. Aspect: 445, 447-450. Assessing writing: 162, 171-172, 175. Assimilative approach: 238. Attitudes towards assessing writing: 162, 168-169, 174. Attitudes: 49, 53, 60, 62, 312, 315- 316, 328-330. Attitudinal questionnaire: 8-10. Audio-lingual approach: 4-5. Authentic communication: 7. Authentic texts: 369, 371. Automaticity: 405-406, 412. Autonomous: 229, 235, 237, 239. Averroes: 339-340. Avicenna: 339-340. BANA: 144-146. Beliefs: 49, 60, 62. Bilingual delivery: 304. Bilingual module: 296, 303-304. Bilingual teaching: 304. Bilingual tutoring: 305. Bilingualism: 236, 238. Bi-literacy continua: 229, 236. Bottom-up models: 404-406, 414. Case study: 104. Central processing hypothesis: 401. Challenge(s): 54, 56, 94, 100, 107- 110, 112. Children’s needs: 326. Clash of civilizations: 125. Classical Arabic (CA): 403-404. Classroom inquiry: 94, 103, 113. Cognitive: 34-35, 41. Collaboration: 102, 107, 113, 211. Collaborative planning: 210. Collaborative: 93, 101-108, 111, 113. Collectivist society: 79-80. Colonialism: 121. 468 Index Common verbs: 446....

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