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Global English and Arabic

Issues of Language, Culture, and Identity

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Edited By Ahmad Al-Issa and Laila S. Dahan

This volume contains selected chapters from researchers and scholars concerning global English in the Arab world. It brings a new perspective to the phenomenon of global English as today’s lingua franca by focusing on an area of the world that is troubled by the spread of English. The book goes to the heart of a linguistic dilemma: the impact of global English on the Arabic language, Arab culture, and identity. New empirical evidence and insights into this problem are presented by a variety of researchers. The majority raise concerns about the long-term viability of Modern Standard Arabic in the face of global English. In light of the ever-expanding growth of global English, this book gives voice to the worries of people in the Arab world about maintaining their language, culture, and identity.

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Fatma Faisal Saad Said - 7 “Ahyaanan I text in English ‘ashaan it’s ashal ”: Language Crisisor Linguistic Development? The Case of How Gulf Arabs Perceive the Future of their Language, Culture, and Identity - 179

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Fatma Faisal Saad Said 7 “Ahyaanan I text in English ‘ashaan it’s ashal”: Language Crisis or Linguistic Development? The Case of How Gulf Arabs Perceive the Future of their Language, Culture, and Identity Abstract Gulf Arabs are perceived as the most advanced of the Arabs in terms of state wealth, living standards, quality of life, education, and literacy levels for both men and women and overall opportunities availed to them by virtue of being citizens. In order for this advancement to have taken place the Gulf had to find a way of educating its people to international standards. One such way was the introduction of English in the education system at all levels and most importantly in higher education. Foreign workers from Europe, America, Canada, and Australia were brought in to assist in this moderni- zation process and the language of common communication became English. After two or three decades, there are now calls to revive Arabic and reduce the ef fect and impact of English, not only in the education system but in the everyday lives of Gulf Arabs, where the use of English in non-formal situations has become the norm. Some quarters are claiming that the Arabic language is at the beginning of its death and soon will have no speakers, if English continues to be promoted over Arabic, in the media, through domestic South Asian maids and nannies, and in the education system. Through the collection of countless forum discussions (mostly Gulf muntadayaat) and blog pages, ten...

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