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Motivation of New Generation Students for Learning Physics and Mathematics

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Palmira Pečiuliauskienė and Valdemaras Aleksa

The aim of the research is to reveal the effects of inquiry on the motivation of new generation students for learning Physics and Mathematics. Self-Determination Theory gives a theoretical background for the research. Quantitative methods dominate in this monograph. The monograph analyses the motivation for learning science in terms of inquiry levels, as well as in terms of real and digital Physics labs. The monograph also reveals the role of significant social issues in promoting intrinsic motivation and communication of lower secondary school students. The monograph considers motivation for learning Mathematics. The research discloses students’ attitude towards the educational and social benefit of learning Mathematics.

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4 Empirical insights into the motivation of school students for learning Mathematics

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4Empirical insights into the motivation of school students for learning Mathematics

4.1Extrinsic and intrinsic motivation of students for learning Mathematics

By Palmira Pečiuliauskienė

The section considers the motivation for learning Mathematics. The data of a national research (2012) on the 8th grade students are analysed according to the model of motivation continuum from the lowest level of extrinsic motivation to intrinsic motivation. Research is based on disclosing students’ attitude towards the educational and social benefit of learning Mathematics.

4.1.1Introduction

The theoretical background of motivation for learning is presented in the theoretical part of this monograph (The Theoretical Background of New Generation Student’s Motivation for Learning). In this chapter we remind the main ideas of the Self‒Determination (SDT) Theory on motivation in relation to the motivation for learning Maths. From the perspective of SDT, the three basic psychological needs are the need for competency (the desire to feel efficacious, to have an effect on one’s environment, and to attain valued outcomes), the need for autonomy (the desire to be self-initiating and to have a sense of acting in accordance with one’s own sense of self), and the need for relatedness (the desire to feel connected with and to be accepted by significant others) (Ryan & Deci, 2002; Loucomies, 2013).

Humans live in a socium; their social environments can either facilitate or inhibit motivation. Motivation can be seen as a result of interactions between an individual’s need system...

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