Show Less
Restricted access

Deliberation and Democracy: Innovative Processes and Institutions

Series:

Edited By Stephen Coleman, Anna Przybylska and Yves Sintomer

As our experience regarding the practice of deliberation grows, the position from which we evaluate it, and the criteria of this evaluation, change. This book presents a synthesis of recent research that has brought detailed and robust results. Its first section concerns contemporary challenges and new approaches to the public sphere. The second focuses on the Deliberative Poll as a specific deliberative technique and compares findings emanating from this practice in various political and cultural contexts. The third section addresses the challenge of determining what constitutes deliberative quality. Finally, the last section discusses democratic deliberation and deliberative democracy as they relate to the complex challenges of contemporary politics.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Tatsuro Sakano - Chapter Eight. To What Extent Do Deliberative Polls Promote Discursive Rationality? Some Evidence from a Deliberative Poll on Reframing Regional Governments in the Prefecture of Kanagawa, Japan

Extract

| 151 →

Tatsuro Sakano

Chapter Eight. To What Extent Do Deliberative Polls Promote Discursive Rationality? Some Evidence from a Deliberative Poll on Reframing Regional Governments in the Prefecture of Kanagawa, Japan

Introduction

Japan is known for its strong bureaucracy. Formally the legislative and budgeting power is vested in elected officials and their assemblies. However, the elected officials depend on bureaucrats when they formulate policies. Thus most policies and ordinances are understood to be practically made by bureaucrats. While the fundamental nature of the government has not changed for many years, citizen participation in administrative planning has been institutionalized gradually since the 1970’s. Town meetings and public comments are now common at all levels of government, from the nationwide to municipal. Some local governments have taken a step further to enact basic ordinances in order to stipulate their citizens’ right to participate in policy making. Kanagawa prefecture, lying south-west of Tokyo, is one of such leading local governments. Out of forty-seven prefecture-level governments, the Kanagawa Prefectural Government (KPG) was third to enact such ordinances in the year 2009. In the same year the first DP in Japan was held by the KPG (Sakano 2012, 24–29).

Along with the trends of expanding citizen participation, social experiments using mini-publics started in the late 1990s. The first Japanese Consensus Conference was held in 1998 by STS (Science, Technology and Society) in a group concerned with gene therapy. It is reported that at least 10...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.