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British Identities since 1707

Edited By Richard J. Finlay and Paul Ward

The historiography of British identities has flourished since the mid-1970s, spurred on by increasing national consciousness in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, and since 1997 by devolution. Historians and other academics have become increasingly aware that identities in the British Isles have been fluid and that interactions between the different parts of the British Isles have been central to historical developments since, and indeed before, the Act of Union between England and Scotland in 1707.
This series seeks to encourage exploration of identities of place in the British Isles since the early eighteenth century, including intersections between competing and complementary identities such as region and nation. The series also advances discussion of other identities such as class, gender, religion, politics, ethnicity and culture when these are geographically located and positioned. While the series is historical, it welcomes cross- and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of British identities.
British Identities since 1707 examines the unity and diversity of the British Isles, developing consideration of the multiplicity of negotiations that have taken place in such a multinational and multi-ethnic group of Islands. lt will include discussions of nationalism(s), of Britishness, Englishness, Scattishness, Welshness and Irishness, as well as 'regional' identities including, for example, those associated with Cornwall, the Gäidhealtachd region in Scotland and Gaeltacht areas in Ireland. The series will encompass discussions of relations with continental Europe and the United States, with ethnic and immigrant identities and with other forms of identity associated with the British Isles as place. The editors are interested in publishing books relating to the wider British world, including current and former parts of the British Empire and the Commonwealth, and places such as Gibraltar and the Falkland Islands and the smaller islands of the British archipelago. British Identities since 1707 reinforces the consideration of history, culture and politics as richly diverse across and within the borders of the British Isles.