Show Less
Restricted access

Deleuze and Collaborative Writing

An Immanent Plane of Composition

Series:

Jonathan Wyatt, Ken Gale, Susanne Gannon and Bronwyn Davies

This book is a passionate engagement with Gilles Deleuze and collaborative writing, in which four writers explore together the insights that Deleuze has contributed to the topic. This powerful and complex text, which will appeal to scholars within qualitative inquiry, investigates the question of how we might begin to write, together, on what Deleuze would call an immanent plane of composition. On such a Deleuzian plane, or plateau, the writers seek to bond with Deleuze, to open up with him a new stream of thought and of being.
Jonathan Wyatt, Ed.D., is the head of professional development at the Oxford Learning Institute, a research fellow at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, and a counselor in primary care within the National Health Service. He is interested in the performative and collaborative writing and autoethnography of life and loss.
Ken Gale, Ed.D., is a lecturer in education working in the Faculty of Education at the University of Plymouth in the United Kingdom. His particular teaching interests are located within the philosophy of education, poststructural theory, and the application of narrative and autoethnographic approaches in education research. His research interests focus on the theory and practice of collaborative and performative writing practices as methods of inquiry and how these might be applied to areas of subjectivity, friendship, gender studies, and in education studies and professional development.
Susanne Gannon, PhD, is an associate professor in the School of Education at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. Much of her work demonstrates her continuing interest in tracing the impact and effects of poststructural theories on writing practices.
Bronwyn Davies, PhD, is an independent scholar based in Sydney, Australia. She is also a professorial fellow at the University of Melbourne. The distinctive features of her work are her development of innovative social science research methodologies incorporating elements of the visual, literary, and performative arts on the one hand and its strong base in the conceptual work of poststructuralist philosophers such as Butler, Deleuze, and Foucault on the other.