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New Insights in Germanic Linguistics III

Series:

Irmengard Rauch and Gerald F. Carr

The contributions in New Insights in Germanic Linguistics III are representative of the stimulating and productive medley of offerings presented at the April 2000 meetings of the Berkeley Germanic Linguistics Roundtable. Formal syntax informs the essays of Boas, Janko, Mallen, and Roehrs, which yield evidence from German, English, Scandinavian, and Romance languages. The syntax essays of Waltz and Wilhelm deal with Old English/Latin and with Old Hittite. Phonological studies by Barrack and Goblirsch draw on Spanish, Arabic, Dutch, and Danish relative to North Frisian. While Liberman presents work on the West Germanic vocalism through time, Scheuringer concentrates on Modern German dialect reflexes of Old High German. Old Saxon serves as the database for Jeep’s study of binomials and Rauch’s pragmatic strategies. Finally, Cleek offers new North and South German fieldwork data on banking terminology.
Contents: Charles M. Barrack: Gamkrelidze versus Grimm: Devoicing in Proto-Germanic – Hans C. Boas: Syntactic or lexical licensing of non-subcategorized arguments? - The case of German «Sätzchen» – John Cleek: Money talks: Evidence from fieldwork in the Federal Republic of Germany – Kurt Gustav Goblirsch: The North Frisian lenition and Danish linguistic hegemony – Jiri Janko: Case attraction construction in Old High German – John Jeep: The rhetorical significance of the alliterative tradition in the Heliand – Anatoly Libermann: From the history of closed vowels in West Germanic – Enrique Mallen: On the distribution of restrictive vs. nonrestrictive adjectives. Germanic and Romance – Irmengard Rauch: Historical pragmatics: Pervasive evidence from Old Saxon – Dorian Roehrs: Toward eliminating case as a driving force for movement: «Licensing» of case and default case – Hermann Scheuringer: Still needed - Old High German vocalism explaining New High German dialect variation – Heidi Waltz: Delbrück’s Umdrehung in context – Christopher Wilhelm: Old Hittite postpositions: A fuzzy problem.