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Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education

Perspectives on Professional Practice

by Jennifer Valcke (Volume editor) Robert Wilkinson (Volume editor)
Conference proceedings 260 Pages

Summary

This book offers a collection of original papers showing how Higher education institutions have coped with changing the language of instruction. It points out that Higher education institutions have undergone radical change in the past decades; of which the shift to English-medium instruction, as well as bi- or plurilingual programmes, is one notable example. The papers comprise new research on teaching and learning through an additional language, and its impact on professional development for university teachers, programme and course development, as well as quality assurance. The articles span different international contexts, and provide education developers, university teachers, educational administrators, language experts, and others, with global perspectives on the professional practices of university teachers.

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the editors
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • Preface (Roy Lyster)
  • Content and language separation
  • Content and language integration
  • Teacher collaboration
  • All teachers are language teachers
  • References
  • Introduction – ICLHE, professional practice, disruption, and quality (Jennifer Valcke / Robert Wilkinson)
  • References
  • Professional development of international classroom lecturers (Karen M. Lauridsen)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Higher education teacher training – the current state of play
  • 3. Internationalisation of higher education
  • 4. So what are the issues?
  • 5. The lecturers’ needs and how to meet them
  • 6. Meeting the challenges – Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
  • 7. Conclusion
  • References
  • Purposeful interaction and the professional development of content teachers: Observations of small-group teaching and learning in the international classroom (Kevin Haines)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Facilitating purposeful interaction in the international classroom
  • 3. Purposeful Interaction in the International Classroom
  • 3.1 Diversity
  • 3.2 Learning Outcomes
  • 3.3 Pedagogy
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Teachers’ perceptions of need in EAP and ICLHE contexts (Maria Ellison / Sofia Aráujo / Marta Correia / Fátima Vieira)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Examining teacher needs: a needs analysis approach
  • 2.1. Present and Target Situational Analysis (PSA and TSA)
  • 2.2. Deficiency analysis (DA)
  • 2.3. Strategy and means analysis (SA and MA)
  • 3. The EAP programme for academics at UP
  • 3.1. Context
  • 3.2. The EAP programme
  • 4. The Study
  • 4.1. Methodology
  • 4.2. Initial needs analysis
  • 4.3. Interim needs analysis
  • 4.4. Final needs analysis
  • 5. Conclusion
  • References
  • Teacher perceptions of teaching CLIL courses (Nina Niemelä / Heidi Jauni)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Research design
  • 2.1 Context
  • 2.2 Participants
  • 2.3 Instruments and procedures
  • 3. Results
  • a) Less frequently-used practices in teaching
  • b) Wide variation between answers
  • c) Blank answers
  • 4. Conclusion
  • References
  • Appendix
  • I feel traumatized: Teachers’ beliefs on the roles of languages and learning in CLIL (Erwin Gierlinger)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Research design and methodology
  • 2.1. Data coding
  • 3. Results and discussion
  • 3.1. C 1: CLIL teachers’ beliefs on the CLIL classroom as a social learning space
  • 3.2. C 2: CLIL teachers’ pedagogical subject content beliefs
  • 3.3. C 3: CLIL teachers’ pedagogical second language content beliefs
  • 3.4. C 4: CLIL teachers’ pedagogical beliefs on code switching
  • 3.4.1. C 4–1: Behaviour management code switching
  • 3.4.2. C 4–2: Classroom and task management code switching
  • 3.4.3. C 4–3: Concept management code switching
  • 3.5. C 5: CLIL teachers’ beliefs on being dynamic language users
  • 4. Conclusion
  • References
  • Researching tertiary EMI and pronunciation. A case study from Vienna (Karin Richter)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The context
  • 3. Research questions and methodology
  • 4. Selected findings and discussion
  • 4.1. Comparative analysis of the two groups
  • 4.2. Factors accounting for difference in development
  • 4.3 Informant #61
  • 5. Conclusion
  • List of acronyms used
  • References
  • Crossing borders: The challenges and benefits of a collaborative approach to course development involving content and language specialists in different countries (Linda Weinberg / Miriam Symon)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Collaboration between content and language instructors
  • 3. The development process
  • 3.1. Rationale
  • 3.2. Syllabus design
  • 3.3. Content goals
  • 3.4. Language goals
  • 3.5. Pedagogical approach
  • 3.6. Course content and assignments
  • 3.7. Assessment
  • 4. Creating a support infrastructure
  • 4.1. Professional development for English as a foreign language (EFL) and content lecturers
  • 4.2. Language toolbox
  • 5. Benefits and challenges
  • 5.1. Collaboration between content and language experts
  • 5.2. Challenges facing EMI students
  • 5.3. Challenges facing EMI lecturers
  • 5.4. Challenges facing EFL teachers
  • 6. Crossing Borders
  • References
  • Cooperation and collaboration in undergraduate EMI: Adapting EAP to the emergence of blended academic norms and practices in a Japanese University (Howard Brown)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The context of EMI and EAP in Japan
  • 3. EMI and the emergence of blended academic norms and practices
  • 4. Adapting EAP to localized EMI needs: One university’s case
  • 4.1 Communication across disciplinary boundaries
  • 4.1.1 Cross-disciplinary communication at UNP
  • 4.1.2 Interdisciplinary collaboration at UNP
  • 5. Conclusion
  • References
  • Partial English instruction in English-medium instruction (EMI) practice: Perspectives from lecturers in a University in Indonesia (Nurmala Elmin Simbolon)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. EMI practice in global contexts
  • 2.1 Studies of teacher perspectives/beliefs of EMI practice
  • 2.2 The research question
  • 3. Methodology
  • 4. Results
  • 4.1 Interviews
  • 4.1.1 Partial English instruction
  • 4.1.2 Reasons for partial English instruction
  • 4.2 Classroom observations
  • 5. Discussion and conclusions
  • 5.1 Discussion
  • 5.2 Conclusions
  • References
  • Differences in content presentation and learning outcomes in English-medium instruction (EMI) vs. Italian-medium instruction (IMI) contexts (Francesca Costa / Cristina Mariotti)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Literature review
  • 3. Methodology
  • 3.1 Sample
  • 3.2 Instruments
  • 4. Interview analysis
  • 5. Statistical analysis of exam marks
  • 6. Discourse analysis of the transcriptions of the lectures
  • 7. Discussion and conclusions
  • References
  • Challenges and opportunities of training teachers for plurilingual education (Elena Romero Alfaro / Francisco Zayas Martínez)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1 Social responsibility and educational context
  • 1.2 A new educational perspective for ITT at University
  • 2. Defining language policies for a faculty of education
  • 3. Piloting experiences and developing strategies
  • 4. The plurilingual project today
  • 4.1 The stakeholders
  • 4.2 Language Upgrading Activities (LUP)
  • 4.3 CLIL activities
  • 4.4 Research activity in CLIL
  • 4.5 Transferring and advising
  • 5. Conclusions
  • References
  • Programme directors’ attitudes towards EMI quality assurance: An exploratory study (Patrick Studer / Curtis Gautschi)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Conceptual framework
  • 3. Method
  • 4. Results
  • 4.1 Beliefs about students
  • 4.2 Beliefs about teachers
  • 4.3 Beliefs about CLIL
  • 4.4 Outlook
  • 4.5 Beliefs about quality management for EMI
  • 5. Discussion
  • 6. Conclusion
  • References
  • Appendix
  • Epilogue – New perspectives on professional practice in the integration of content and language in higher education (ICLHE) (Yolanda Ruiz de Zarobe)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Professional practice and the role of the teacher
  • 3. Content and language learning and use
  • Funding
  • References
  • List of reviewers

Jennifer Valcke/Robert Wilkinson (eds.)

Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education

Perspectives on Professional Practice

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About the editors

Jennifer Valcke is a senior lecturer and education developer at Karolinska Institutet (Sweden), where she trains teachers and advises on issues related to “English-Medium Instruction” and “Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education”.

Robert Wilkinson, Maastricht University (the Netherlands), works in the domains of “Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education”, “English-Medium Instruction”, and language policy.

About the book

This book offers a collection of original papers showing how Higher education institutions have coped with changing the language of instruction. It points out that Higher education institutions have undergone radical change in the past decades; of which the shift to English-medium instruction, as well as bi- or plurilingual programmes, is one notable example. The papers comprise new research on teaching and learning through an additional language, and its impact on professional development for university teachers, programme and course development, as well as quality assurance. The articles span different international contexts, and provide education developers, university teachers, educational administrators, language experts, and others, with global perspectives on the professional practices of university teachers.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Contents

Roy Lyster

Preface

Jennifer Valcke and Robert Wilkinson

Introduction – ICLHE, professional practice, disruption, and quality

Karen M. Lauridsen

Professional development of international classroom lecturers

Kevin Haines

Purposeful interaction and the professional development of content teachers: Observations of small-group teaching and learning in the international classroom

Maria Ellison, Sofia Aráujo, Marta Correia and Fátima Vieira

Teachers’ perceptions of need in EAP and ICLHE contexts

Nina Niemelä and Heidi Jauni

Teacher perceptions of teaching CLIL courses

Erwin Gierlinger

I feel traumatized: Teachers’ beliefs on the roles of languages and learning in CLIL

Karin Richter

Researching tertiary EMI and pronunciation. A case study from Vienna

Linda Weinberg and Miriam Symon

Crossing borders: The challenges and benefits of a collaborative approach to course development involving content and language specialists in different countries

Howard Brown

Cooperation and collaboration in undergraduate EMI: Adapting EAP to the emergence of blended academic norms and practices in a Japanese University ←5 | 6→

Nurmala Elmin Simbolon

Partial English instruction in English-medium instruction (EMI) practice: Perspectives from lecturers in a University in Indonesia

Francesca Costa and Cristina Mariotti

Differences in content presentation and learning outcomes in English-medium instruction (EMI) vs. Italian-medium instruction (IMI) contexts

Elena Romero Alfaro and Francisco Zayas Martínez

Challenges and opportunities of training teachers for plurilingual education

Patrick Studer and Curtis Gautschi

Programme directors’ attitudes towards EMI quality assurance: An exploratory study

Yolanda Ruiz de Zarobe

Epilogue – New perspectives on professional practice in the integration of content and language in higher education (ICLHE)

List of reviewers ←6 | 7→

Roy Lyster
McGill University, Canada

Preface

There is increasing concern that ICL does not systematically address the kind of academic discourse required to become pluriliterate users of academic disciplines. It is not simply a question of teaching in English.

Thus were aptly expressed the challenges of Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education (ICLHE) in the advertisement for the 2015 ICLHE Conference held at the Université libre de Bruxelles. Framing the issues as “not simply a question of teaching in English” helped to build a stimulating conference and was a strong incentive for me personally to participate.

When I was invited to be a plenary speaker at the conference, I was initially hesitant, because most of my research had focused on content and language integration at the school level. I wondered how my work with young learners in schools could possibly contribute to ICLHE. I was enticed, though, by some of the core themes that drove the conference, also highlighted in the promotional brochure:

Details

Pages
260
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631706930
ISBN (PDF)
9783653072631
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631706947
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631681268
Language
English
Publication date
2017 (March)
Tags
Teaching / Learning University Professional development Bilingualism Internationalisation Multilingualism
Published
Frankfurt am Main, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2017. 260 pp., 5 b/w ill.

Biographical notes

Jennifer Valcke (Volume editor) Robert Wilkinson (Volume editor)

Jennifer Valcke is a senior lecturer and education developer at Karolinska Institutet (Sweden), where she trains teachers and advises on issues related to «English-Medium Instruction» and «Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education». Robert Wilkinson, Maastricht University (the Netherlands), works in the domains of «Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education», «English-Medium Instruction», and language policy

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Title: Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education