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Towards a Better Understanding of Metonymy

by Wojciech Wachowski (Author)
Monographs XVIII, 178 Pages

Summary

The general aim of this book is to contribute to a better understanding of metonymy, a phenomenon which still, despite the current upsurge in scholarly attention, remains puzzling in some respects. The theoretical framework of this book is provided by the school of thought commonly known as Cognitive Linguistics. The first part of the book analyses and develops various hypotheses concerning the nature of metonymy advanced in the literature to date. It presents numerous arguments in favour of the conceptual rather than purely linguistic basis of metonymy and shows that metonymy is a ubiquitous phenomenon not only in language but above all in thought. The second part contains a thorough analysis of the constraints to the scope of metonymy and discusses the differences between metonymy and other forms of so-called figurative language. The third part is devoted to the role and importance of metonymy in communication and focuses on the creative functions of metonymy, which have received surprisingly little scholarly attention to date, such as euphemism, vague language, and humour. The fourth part of this book is centred on some problematic issues concerning the distinction between metonymy, metaphor, and synecdoche.

Table Of Content


Wojciech Wachowski

TOWARDS
A BETTER UNDERSTANDING
OF METONYMY

image
PETER LANG

Oxford • Bern • Berlin • Bruxelles • New York • Wien

Die Deutsche Nationalbibliothek lists this publication in the Deutsche Nationalbibliografie; detailed bibliographic data is available on the Internet at

http://dnb.d-nb.de.

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Names: Wachowski, Wojciech, author.

Title: Towards a better understanding of metonymy / Wojciech Wachowski.

Description: Oxford ; New York : Peter Lang, 2019. | Series: Literary and cultural stylistics ; 44 | Includes bibliographical references and index.

Identifiers: LCCN 2018024750 | ISBN 9781788743457 (alk. paper)

Subjects: LCSH: Metonyms. | Cognitive grammar.

Classification: LCC P301.5.M49 W65 2018 | DDC 401/.43--dc23 LC record
available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2018024750

Cover design by Peter Lang Ltd.

ISSN 1660-9301

ISBN 978-1-78874-345-7 (print) • ISBN 978-1-78874-346-4 (ePDF)

ISBN 978-1-78874-347-1 (ePub) • ISBN 978-1-78874-348-8 (mobi)

© Peter Lang AG 2019

Published by Peter Lang Ltd, International Academic Publishers,

52 St Giles, Oxford, OX1 3LU, United Kingdom

oxford@peterlang.com, www.peterlang.com

Wojciech Wachowski has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988, to be identified as Author of this Work.

All rights reserved.

All parts of this publication are protected by copyright.

Any utilisation outside the strict limits of the copyright law, without

the permission of the publisher, is forbidden and liable to prosecution.

This applies in particular to reproductions, translations, microfilming,

and storage and processing in electronic retrieval systems.

This publication has been peer reviewed.

About the author

WOJCIECH WACHOWSKI is Assistant Professor in the Institute of Modern Languages and Applied Linguistics at Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz, Poland. He is also an Endeavour Research Fellow at the University of Queensland, Australia, and has lectured as a visiting professor at several European universities. He has published on various topics in linguistics, especially cognitive linguistics and sociolinguistics. His main research interests include metonymy and metaphor, and teacher and translator training.

About the book

The general aim of this book is to contribute to a better understanding of metonymy, a phenomenon which still, despite the current upsurge in scholarly attention, remains puzzling in some respects. The theoretical framework of this book is provided by the school of thought commonly known as Cognitive Linguistics. The first part of the book analyses and develops various hypotheses concerning the nature of metonymy advanced in the literature to date. It presents numerous arguments in favour of the conceptual rather than purely linguistic basis of metonymy and shows that metonymy is a ubiquitous phenomenon not only in language but above all in thought. The second part contains a thorough analysis of the constraints on the scope of metonymy and discusses the differences between metonymy and other forms of so-called figurative language. The third part is devoted to the role and importance of metonymy in communication and focuses on the creative functions of metonymy, which have received surprisingly little scholarly attention to date, such as euphemism, vague language, and humour. The fourth part of this book is centred on some problematic issues concerning the distinction between metonymy, metaphor, and synecdoche.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Details

Pages
XVIII, 178
ISBN (PDF)
9781788743464
ISBN (ePUB)
9781788743471
ISBN (MOBI)
9781788743488
ISBN (Softcover)
9781788743457
Language
English
Publication date
2019 (September)
Tags
metonymy metaphor synecdoche cognitive linguistics figurative language figures of speech figures of the mind tropes contiguity category script frame Idealized Cognitive Model similarity
Published
Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, New York, Wien, 2019. XVIII, 178 pp., 45 fig. b/w, 2 tables

Biographical notes

Wojciech Wachowski (Author)

Wojciech Wachowski is Assistant Professor in the Institute of Modern Languages and Applied Linguistics at Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz, Poland. He is also an Endeavour Research Fellow at the University of Queensland, Australia, and has lectured as a visiting professor at several European universities. He has published on various topics in linguistics, especially cognitive linguistics and sociolinguistics. His main research interests include metonymy and metaphor, and teacher and translator training.

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Title: Towards a Better Understanding of Metonymy