Loading...

Language and Mind

Proceedings from the 32nd International Conference of the Croatian Applied Linguistics Society

by Mihaela Matesic (Volume editor) Anita Memišević (Volume editor)
Conference proceedings 184 Pages

Summary

The topic of the book is the relationship between mind and language on all levels of linguistic research. Over the past decade, the cognitive approach to language and its methodology have started to permeate other areas of linguistic study, which, in turn, is opening up room for new types of research and resulting in new knowledge that contributes to explaining not only the linguistic phenomena, but also how they function in a linguistic community and contemporary society. The book tries to reflect these new developments. It consists of 11 chapters organized into three thematic sections: language and mind from linguistic perspective, the language and mind of the translator, and language and mind from the teacher’s perspective.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the editors
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Acknowledgments
  • Preface
  • Contents
  • List of Contributors
  • Cognitive factors in speech production and perception: A socio-cognitive model of phonetic convergence (Daniel Duran and Natalie Lewandowski)
  • Category fluency in Croatian-speaking patients with first-episode psychosis with schizophrenia features/symptoms (Petar Gabrić, Iva Kužina, Mija Vandek, Martina Sekulić Sović, Ninoslav Mimica, and Aleksandar Savić)
  • Subject pronoun interpretation in Croatian monolingual children (Tihana Kraš and Tanja Stipeć)
  • Conceptualize with colours: The case of Italian language (Caterina Saracco)
  • Misliti vs. razmisliti: Pragmatics and semantics of thinking in Croatian (Anita Memišević and Mihaela Matešić)
  • Translating lexical gaps: A contrastive corpus-based analysis (Olja Perišić Arsić)
  • Semantic structure of terms and translation: The French lexeme dispositif as an enfant terrible of special field terminology (Marta Petrak)
  • Interpreting expertise and mind: Working memory and selective attention in conference interpreter training (Serena Ghiselli)
  • English as an international language and English language teaching: A critical analysis of cultural content in two coursebooks (Irena Vodopija Krstanović and Izabela Weber)
  • Integrating ELF into ELT: Comparative insights from Croatia and Finland (Branka Drljača Margić and Deni Kirinčić)
  • Preservice teacher self-efficacy beliefs (Dino Dumančić)

List of Contributors

Olja Perišić Arsić

Università degli studi di Torino, Italy

olja.perisic@unito.it, oljaarsic@hotmail.com

Dino Dumančić

University of Zadar, Department of English

ddumancic@unizd.hr

Daniel Duran

Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany

daniel.duran@germanistik.uni-freiburg.de

Petar Gabrić

University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences; Department of Linguistics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for biological psychiatry and psychogeriatrics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for diagnostics and intensive treatment

petar.gabric1@gmail.com

Serena Ghiselli

University of Bologna

serena.ghiselli3@unibo.it; serena.ghiselli@gmail.com

Deni Kirinčić

Rijeka’s First Croatian Grammar School

deni.kirincic@gmail.com

Tihana Kraš

University of Rijeka,

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

tkras@ffri.hr

Irena Vodopija Krstanović

University of Rijeka,

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

ivodopija@ffri.hr

Iva Kužina

University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences; Department of Linguistics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for biological psychiatry and psychogeriatrics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for diagnostics and intensive treatment

Natalie Lewandowski

Independent scientist, Stuttgart, Germany

natalie.lewandowski@web.de

Branka Drljača Margić

University of Rijeka, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

bdrljaca@ffri.hr

Mihaela Matešić

University of Rijeka, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

mmatesic@ffri.hr

←13 | 14→

Anita Memišević

University of Rijeka, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

amemisevic@ffri.hr

Ninoslav Mimica

University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences; Department of Linguistics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for biological psychiatry and psychogeriatrics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for diagnostics and intensive treatment

Marta Petrak

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

University of Zagreb

mpetrak@ffzg.hr

Caterina Saracco

University of Genoa

caterina.saracco@gmail.com

Aleksandar Savić

University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences; Department of Linguistics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for biological psychiatry and psychogeriatrics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for diagnostics and intensive treatment

Martina Sekulić Sović

University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences; Department of Linguistics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for biological psychiatry and psychogeriatrics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for diagnostics and intensive treatment

Tanja Stipeć

Delnice Secondary School

Aepis.tanja@yahoo.com

Mija Vandek

University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences; Department of Linguistics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for biological psychiatry and psychogeriatrics; Psychiatric Hospital Vrapče, Institute for diagnostics and intensive treatment

Izabela Weber

University of Rijeka

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

izabela.weber@uniri.hr

Daniel Duran and Natalie Lewandowski

Cognitive factors in speech production and perception: A socio-cognitive model of phonetic convergence/Kognitive Faktoren in der Sprachproduktion und Perzeption: Ein sozio-kognitives Modell der phonetischen Konvergenz

Abstract: Phonetic convergence, the phenomenon when two speakers become more alike within the course of a dialog, tells us much about the cognitive basis of speech production and perception. We present a hybrid socio-cognitive exemplar model of this phenomenon, which incorporates social as well as psychological (personality-related) and cognitive (processing skill-related) aspects and usage-based factors. A possible computational implementation of this model is briefly outlined, and its predictions and its relevance are discussed.

Keywords: Speech production-perception loop, convergence, attention

Zusammenfassung: Phonetische Konvergenz, das Phänomen bei dem sich zwei Sprecher im Verlauf eines Dialogs aneinander angleichen, verrät viel über die kognitive Basis der Sprachproduktion und -wahrnehmung. Wir präsentieren ein hybrides sozio-kognitives Exemplarmodell dieses Phänomens, das soziale wie auch psychologische (persönlichkeitsbezogene) und kognitive (verarbeitungsbezogene) Aspekte und gebrauchsbasierte Faktoren beinhaltet. Eine mögliche komputationelle Implementierung dieses Models wird kurz vorgestellt und seine Vorhersagen und Relevanz diskutiert.

Schlusselworter: Sprachproduktions-perzeptions-Schleife; Konvergenz; Aufmerksamkeit

1 Introduction

The dynamics of verbal interaction provide insights into the cognitive basis of speech processing, its underlying psychological and social factors, as well as the mental representation and organization of linguistic knowledge. The phenomenon of convergence has received much attention recently. It shows that seemingly random phonetic and linguistic variability in speech production is affected by various factors. Aspects of speech processing correlate with cognitive factors ←15 | 16→such as attention, cognitive load, and working memory (Mattys and Wiget, 2011, Zekveld and Kramer, 2014). They are also affected by personality and social factors in spoken interactions (Schweitzer et al., 2017).

In this chapter, we present a socio-cognitive model of convergence, which takes into account social factors as well as individual differences of the speakers’ linguistic experiences, psychological aspects, and also their cognitive processing skills (following the approach proposed by Dabrowska, 2016).

1.1 Exemplar theory

Exemplar theory (ET) as a model of speech perception and production has its origins in cognitive psychology. Hintzman (1986:411) describes its basic idea as follows: “[…] there is only one memory system, which stores episodic traces, […] abstract knowledge as such does not have to be stored but can be derived from the pool of traces of specific experiences at the time of retrieval.”

Details

Pages
184
ISBN (PDF)
9783631824702
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631824719
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631824726
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631810170
Language
English
Publication date
2020 (June)
Tags
Phonetics syntax semantics translation interpreting teaching
Published
Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2019. 184 S., 12 s/w Abb., 19 Tab.

Biographical notes

Mihaela Matesic (Volume editor) Anita Memišević (Volume editor)

Mihaela Matešić is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka, Croatia. Her research interests include phonology, semantics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics and cognitive linguistics. As a main researcher or a member of a research team she has contributed to more than ten scientific projects on the national, international and university level. She is an author and co-editor of several books as well as an author and co-author of many scientific papers published in Croatia and abroad. Anita Memišević is Assistant Professor at the English Department, University of Rijeka. Her research interests include semantics of verbs and verbal prefixes, bilingualism, psycholinguistics, cognitive linguistics and translation. She has published and presented a number of papers in Croatia and abroad and has authored a book.

Previous

Title: Language and Mind