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Global Citizenship Education in Post-Secondary Institutions

Theories, Practices, Policies- Foreword by Indira V. Samarasekera

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Edited By Lynette Shultz, Ali A. Abdi and George H. Richardson

Drawing on critical pedagogy, post-colonial analysis, hermeneutic interpretation, and reconceptualist curriculum frameworks, the twenty chapters in this edited collection address, from interrelated perspectives, a gap in the scholarly literature on the theory, practice, and policy of global citizenship and global citizenship education. The book provides readers with analyses and interpretations of the existing state of global citizenship education in post-secondary institutions, and stimulates discussion about the field at a time when there is an intense debate about the current drive to «internationalize» tertiary education and the role global citizenship education should play in that process. International and interdisciplinary in its examination of post-secondary global citizenship education, the book will be useful in courses that focus on policy formation, curriculum development and theorizing in the field.

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2. Engaging the Multiple Discourses of Global Citizenship Education within a Canadian University: Deliberation, Contestation, and Social Justice Possibilities Lynette Shultz 13

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CHAPTER 2 Engaging the Multiple Discourses of Global Citizenship Education within a Canadian University: Deliberation, Contestation, and Social Justice Possibilities Lynette Shultz Introduction As theories and practices of global citizenship education make their way into the poli- cies and programs of higher education institutions, it becomes clear that the founda- tional ideas in this mainstreaming process are diverse and certainly in tension. Issues that previously mattered little to academics and education policymakers begin to draw attention and become more relevant. While what might have been seen as “global edu- cation” in the 1990s and early 2000s, where there was a focus on learning about “oth- ers” and the issues that connected people, there is currently a shift in the inclusion of concepts of citizenship into this global/globalized learning project. Hotly contested issues demand that educators ask difficult questions such as • Whose knowledge counts in a globalized and globalizing world? • Do current knowledge creation and dissemination practices in education institutions mask or perpetuate traditional colonial and neocolonial relations and/or raced, gendered, and classed exclusions? • How can education contribute to a strengthened global public sphere? Global citizenship education has become a container that holds many educators’ and education institutions’ responses to these difficult questions. At its best, global citizen- ship education speaks to how humanity might organize itself to address the very criti- cal issues of this time and how this can happen through just political, economic, and social relations with a consideration of the global/globalized context for such educa- tion. Current...

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