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Synergy I: Marginalisation, Discrimination, Isolation and Existence in Literature

Edited By A.Nejat Töngür and Yıldıray Çevik

Studies on the distinguished works of English and American literature of various genres like poetry, plays and fiction are included in this book focusing on and around the central themes of “Marginalisation, Discrimination, Isolation, and Existence.” The aim of the book is to investigate the issues of “Marginalisation, Discrimination, Isolation, and Existence” within the frameworks of gender, colonization, multiculturalism, religion, race, generation gap, politics, technology, immigration, and class.

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II: WOMEN’S PURSUIT OF POLITICAL RIGHTS IN ENGLAND: SALLY SIMMONDS FROM A SIMPLE MAID TO A STRONG ACTIVIST IN GERTRUDE COLMORE’S SUFFRAGETTE SALLY (Alev KARADUMAN)

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Alev KARADUMAN

Abstract: In the 19th century, the struggle of women in the world to achieve the right to vote began to take place gradually in an organized way, first in the UK and then in the United States in particular. However, the recognition of this issue had its roots in England was with, Vindication of the Rights of Woman, written by Mary Wollstonecraft in 1792. It formed the basis for the ideas of women’s political rights that would become increasingly stronger in the 19th century. In 1851, John Stuart Mill and his wife, Harriet Taylor Mill (1807–1858) who was a powerful women’s rights advocate, first published an article in 1850 called “The Enfranchisement of Women” on the right to vote, and later on in 1861 by publishing the article called “Subjection of Women” (Women’s Addiction) for women to have equal political rights with men. In 1866, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (1836–1917), Britain’s first gynecologist and surgeon, gathered 1,500 signatures for women to have the right to vote and played an important role in the end of the 19th century, in which British women gained various political rights under certain circumstances. The nation-wide movement of British women brought together large masses of women from various classes for the same purpose in the early 20th century. In 1903, Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughters, Christabel and Sylvia, set up the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), attempting to raise awareness in society by taking action on the streets...

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