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Philosophical Essays

Critic Rationalism as Historical-objective Transcendentalism- Edited by Fabio Minazzi- Translation from Italian by Richard Sadleir

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Fabio Minazzi

These Philosophical Essays by Giulio Preti explore, with particular acuteness and originality, some of the major problems addressed by contemporary philosophy. Preti’s objective was to outline a «scientific» philosophy capable of embodying the rigour and concern for the factual found in scientific procedure.
His analysis engaged with the complex tradition of logical empiricism and he also devoted attention to pragmatism and the philosophy of praxis in early Marx. Preti succeeded in establishing a dialogue with these traditions of thought while also considering both Husserl’s early phenomenology and the methodical approach derived from Kantian and neo-Kantian transcendentalism.
He used this wide range of theoretical and practical horizons in innovative ways, presenting a critical metareflection receptive to these varying positions. In doing so Preti developed a new critical rationalism that incorporated a historical-objective transcendentalism.
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Science and Ethics

The Axiological Contexts of Science

Evandro Agazzi and Fabio Minazzi

Philosophy of science used to be identified with the logical and methodological analysis of scientific theories, and any allusion to values was considered as a deplorable intromission in a philosophical investigation that should remain strictly epistemological. As a reaction against this view, an opposite «sociological» approach downplayed the usual virtues of scientific knowledge (such as logical rigor and empirical adequacy) as artificial imageries that cover the actual nature of science, that is a social product submitted to all the kinds of social conditionings and compromises. A more balanced view is badly needed today, when technoscience is permeating all aspects of our civilization and wise persons understand that we cannot survive without using science and technology but at the same time we need to steer their development in view of the real benefit of humankind. We must investigate how science, technology and values are legitimately interconnected and, in particular, how the discourses of ethics, politics and religion can enter a fruitful dialogue with science. The essays presented in this volume offer a valuable contribution to this interdisciplinary study.