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Edited by Eamon Maher

In the space of a few short decades, Ireland has become one of the most globalised societies in the Western world. The full ramifications of this transformation for traditional Irish communities, religious practice, economic activity, as well as literature and the arts, are as yet unknown. What is known is that Ireland’s largely unthinking embrace of globalisation has at times had negative consequences. Unlike some other European countries, Ireland has eagerly and sometimes recklessly grasped the opportunities for material advancement afforded by the global project.
This collection of essays, largely the fruit of two workshops organised under the auspices of the Humanities Institute of Ireland at University College Dublin and the National Centre for Franco-Irish Studies in the Institute of Technology, Tallaght, explores how globalisation has taken such a firm hold on Irish society and provides a cultural perspective on the phenomenon. The book is divided into two sections. The first examines various manifestations of globalisation in Irish society whereas the second focuses on literary representations of globalisation. The contributors, acknowledged experts in the areas of cultural theory, religion, sociology and literature, offer a panoply of viewpoints of Ireland’s interaction with globalisation.
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The Reimagining Ireland Reader

Examining Our Past, Shaping Our Future

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Edited by Eamon Maher

To mark the fact that the Reimagining Ireland series will soon have one hundred volumes in print, this book brings together a selection of essays from the first fifty volumes, carefully chosen to give a flavour of the diversity and multidisciplinary nature of the series. Following a chronological order, it begins with an essay by Luke Gibbons tracing the roots of modernity from the middle decades of the nineteenth century and concludes with Michael Cronin’s discussion of time and place in global Ireland. In between, the reader will find a rich variety of essays on literary criticism, poetry, drama, photography, modernity, advertising, visual culture, immigration and feminism.

This is a collection that will appeal to anyone with a scholarly or personal interest in the cultural forces that have shaped modern Ireland. It is also a testament to the rude good health of contemporary Irish studies, showcasing the work of a talented array of established and emerging scholars currently working in the area.

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Edited by Eamon Maher


The concepts of Ireland and ‘Irishness’ are in constant flux in the wake of an ever-increasing reappraisal of the notion of cultural and national specificity in a world assailed from all angles by the forces of globalisation and uniformity. Reimagining Ireland interrogates Ireland'’s past and present and suggests possibilities for the future by looking at Ireland’'s literature, culture and history and subjecting them to the most up-to-date critical appraisals associated with sociology, literary theory, historiography, political science and theology.

Some of the pertinent issues include, but are not confined to, Irish writing in English and Irish, Nationalism, Unionism, the Northern ‘Troubles’, the Peace Process, economic development in Ireland, the impact and decline of the Celtic Tiger, Irish spirituality, the rise and fall of organised religion, the visual arts, popular cultures, sport, Irish music and dance, emigration and the Irish diaspora, immigration and multiculturalism, marginalisation, globalisation, modernity/postmodernity and postcolonialism.

The series publishes monographs, comparative studies, interdisciplinary projects, conference proceedings and edited books.


“A major intervention in Irish Studies. Irish Studies have come back to Ireland itself. The ‘Reimagining Ireland’ series is at the cutting edge of what it means to be Ireland.” (Prof. Luke Gibbons)

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Edited by Eamon Maher

The aim of this series is to foreground areas of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary connection between France and Ireland, as well as stressing the European dimension of the Franco-Irish nexus. The series also provides a forum for French-language scholarship within the field of Irish studies. We welcome proposals from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, including historical, cultural, literary, sociological, political and linguistic perspectives. The series publishes books in both English and French and all submissions will be peer-reviewed.

L’objectif de cette collection est de valoriser les recherches multi-disciplinaires ou inter-disciplinaires relatives à la France et à l’Irlande, et de souligner la dimension européenne des relations franco-irlandaises. La collection offre également un espace d’échanges pour la recherche francophone en études irlandaises. Nous accueillons des projets de publication relevant de différents champs disciplinaires et s’inscrivant dans une perspective historique, culturelle, littéraire, sociologique, politique ou linguistique. Les ouvrages de la collection sont publiés en anglais et en français ; tous les projets sont soumis à une double révision par les pairs.

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Eamon Maher and Grace Neville

France – Ireland: Anatomy of a Relationship, with a Preface by Professor Joe Lee, is a selection of essays that seeks to explore the many links (spiritual, literary, cultural and historical) that exist between these two Gallic cousins. Figures dealt with in the book include John McGahern, Kate O’Brien, Oscar Wilde, John Broderick, George Moore, Maria Edgeworth, Daniel O’Connell, Wolfe Tone on the Irish side and Barthes, Derrida, Balzac, Flaubert, Julien Green, François Mauriac, Jean Sulivan, Paul Féval, Lamennais, Jean-Pierre Droz, Montalembert, Germaine de Staël among the French. Irish involvement in philosophical debates in France and their military exploits on French soil are also discussed. There is something in these essays for anyone with even a passing interest in Irish or French history, politics and literature.
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Franco-Irish Connections in Space and Time

Peregrinations and Ruminations

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Edited by Eamon Maher and Catherine Maignant

Strong cultural, commercial, literary and intellectual links have existed for many centuries between the Celtic cousins France and Ireland and continue to flourish today. This book explores some of the connections that have been forged over space and time by groups and individuals travelling between the two countries.
Covering subjects as varied as travel literature, music, philosophy, wine production, photography and consumer culture, and spanning the seventeenth through to the twenty-first centuries, the collection draws attention to the rich tapestry of interconnections and associations which confirm this unique and mutually beneficial friendship. The book examines the role of figures such as Boullaye-le-Gouz, Coquebert de Montbret, Sydney Owenson, Alain de Lille, Augusta Holmes, Alain Badiou, Wolfe Tone, Jacques Rancière, the ‘Wine Geese’, the O’Kelly family, Marguerite Mespoulet, Madeleine Mignon, Jules Verne, Hector Malot, Harry Clifton, John McGahern, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Kate O’Brien, John Broderick, Brian Moore and François Mauriac. The essays will appeal to both academic and general readers and to anyone with an interest in Franco-Irish relations.
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Breaking the Mould

Literary Representations of Irish Catholicism

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Edited by Eamon Maher and Eugene O'Brien

Catholicism has played a central role in Irish society for centuries. It is sometimes perceived in a negative light, being associated with repression, antiquated morality and a warped view of sexuality. However, there are also the positive aspects that Catholicism brought to bear on Irish culture, such as the beauty of its rituals, education and health care, or concern for the poor and the underprivileged. Whatever their experience of Catholicism, writers of a certain generation could not escape its impact on their lives, an impact which is pervasive in the literature they produced.
This study, containing twelve chapters written by a range of distinguished literary experts and emerging scholars, explores in a systematic manner the cross-fertilisation between Catholicism and Irish/Irish-American literature written in English. The figures addressed in the book include James Joyce, Maud Gonne, Constance Markievicz, Kate O’Brien, Edwin O’Connor, Brian Moore, John McGahern, Seamus Heaney, Paul Durcan, Vincent Carroll and Brian Friel. This book will serve to underline the complex relationship between creative writers and the once all-powerful religious Establishment.
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Edited by Eamon Maher and Eugene O'Brien

This collection of essays explores the concept of patrimoine, a French word used to denote cultural heritage, traditional customs and practices – the Gaelic equivalent is dúchas – and the extent to which it impacts on France and Ireland. Borrowing from disciplines as varied as sociology, cultural theory, literature, marketing, theology, history, musicology and business, the contributors to the volume unearth interesting manifestations of how patrimoine resonates across cultural divides and bestows uniqueness and specificity on countries and societies, sometimes in a subliminal manner.

Issues covered include debt as heritage, Guinness as a cultural icon of «Irishness», faith-based tourism, the Huguenot heritage in Ireland, Irish musical inheritances since Independence, Skellig Michael and the commodification of Irish culture.

With a Foreword by His Excellency M. Stéphane Crouzat, French Ambassador to Ireland, this collection breaks new ground in assessing the close links between France and Ireland, links that will become all the more important in light of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union.

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Eamon Maher, Grace Neville and Eugene O'Brien

French writers and intellectuals were to the forefront when it came to theorizing the concepts of modernity and postmodernity, and thus such a theme was considered appropriate for this, the second volume in the Studies in Franco-Irish Relations series. The postmodern Irish socio-cultural paradigm is interrogated through the lens of French thought. What is equally interesting is that Irish contexts can also help shed light on the French situation as the processes of secularisation and multicultural diversity, part of the French experience since the 1950s, begin to take root in a society that has become one of the most globalised in the Western world. The interchange and dialogue between the two cultures throws up a panoply of insights that have the capacity to be enriching for both societies.
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Eamon Maher, Grace Neville and Eugene O'Brien

Reinventing Ireland Through a French Prism explores concepts of Irish history, literature, culture and social development by subjecting them to a French perspective. Instead of using the monofocal lens that examines the effects of colonisation and postcolonialisation and Ireland’s problematic relationship with Britain, this book analyses Ireland in the context of the role the country has played in the broader European context, with particular reference to France. The book contains contributions in English and French.
Comme le dit Michel Déon dans sa Préface : « Ces deux pays, l’Irlande avec sa diaspora si puissante, la France avec l’étendue des territoires restés francophones, représentent dans le monde actuel deux havres de paix qui ne souffrent d’aucun malentendu historique et ne peuvent que s’enrichir en se parlant, en s’écrivant en s’écoutant. »