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Modern French Identities

Edited By Peter Collier

This series aims to publish monographs, editions or collections of papers based on recent research into modern French Literature. It welcomes contributions from academics, researchers and writers in British and Irish universities in particular. Modern French Identities focuses on the French and Francophone writing of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, whose formal experiments and revisions of genre have combined to create an entirely new set of literary forms, from the thematic autobiographies of Michel Leiris and Bernard Noël to the magic realism of French Caribbean writers. The idea that identities are constructed rather than found, and that the self is an area to explore rather than a given pretext, runs through much of modern French literature, from Proust, Gide and Apollinaire to Kristeva, Barthes, Duras, Germain and Roubaud. This series reflects a concern to explore the turn-of-the century turmoil in ideas and values that is expressed in the works of theorists like Lacan, Irigaray and Bourdieu and to follow through the impact of current ideologies such as feminism and postmodernism on the literary and cultural interpretation and presentation of the self, whether in terms of psychoanalytic theory, gender, autobiography, cinema, fiction and poetry, or in newer forms like performance art. The series publishes studies of individual authors and artists, comparative studies, and interdisciplinary projects, including those where art and cinema intersect with literature.

Editorial Board
Contemporary Literature and Thought: Martin Crowley (University of Cambridge)
Francophone Studies: Louise Hardwick (University of Birmingham) and Jean Khalfa (University of Cambridge)
Gender and Sexuality Studies: Florian Grandena (University of Ottawa) and Cristina Johnston (University of Stirling)
Language and Linguistics: Michaël Abecassis (University of Oxford)
Literature and Art: Peter Collier (University of Cambridge)
Poetry: Nina Parish (University of Bath) and Emma Wagstaff (University of Birmingham)

Books in this series