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our contributions are discussed in detail throughout this volume. Neither do I contend that black women writers are unique in shaping the critical context in which their writing would be received. To do so would ignore the roles played by Henry James, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf and Ralph Ellison in the critical reception of modernism, to take just one historical case. Still, the African American women who came into print during the last quarter of the twentieth century reflected on their artistic practice with unusual clarity. Their ideas on the particular

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Chapter 14 ← 194 | 195 → CHAPTER FOURTEEN The Rise of Urban Fiction KRISTINA GRAAFF AND VANESSA IRVIN STREET LITERATURE’S HISTORICAL SPACES Urban fiction, also known as street lit, is a contemporary literary genre that focuses on the city experiences of 21st-century African Americans and Latinos. The current iteration of urban fiction, however, has roots in the literary traditions of yesteryear, stemming as far back as the 16th and 17th centuries. In fact, the original street literature publications were in the form of large, poster-sized printouts called

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truth, that until black writers stopped being obsessed by white women then black people would never achieve anything as a community, ←2 |  3→ as a people, as a race.’ (9) To this challenge, Phillips opposes white supremacy which, through the ‘Jim Crow’ laws, warned African-American males that any attempt, real or imagined, at an interracial relationship could lead to lynching. Phillips ( 1984 , 10) refers in particular to the boxer Jack Johnson who, despite having become the first African-American heavyweight champion in 1908, was harassed all his life ‘for having

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Coast Press. ← 555 | 556 → Clinchy, B. M. (2002). Revisiting women’s ways of knowing. In B. K. Hofer & P. R. Pintrich (Eds.), Personal epistemology: The psychology of beliefs about knowledge and knowing (pp. 63–88). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Coiro, J., Knobel, M., Lankshear, C., & Leu, D. (Eds.). (2008). The handbook of research on new literacies . Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Cole, J. B., & Guy-Sheftall, B. (2003). Gender talk: The struggle for omen’s equality in African American communities . New York: Random House. Collins, J. (1995). Literacy and

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. Without going outside his race, and even among the better classes with their ‘white’ culture and conscious American manners, but still Negro enough to be different, there is sufficient matter to furnish a black artist with a lifetime of creative work. And when he chooses to touch on the relations between Negroes and whites in this country, with their innumerable overtones and undertones, surely, and especially for literature and the drama, there is an inexhaustible supply of themes at hand. (Hughes 1926) Hughes was suggesting as early as 1920 that African-American

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field of black feminist criticism. I am one of them, after all, and our contributions are discussed in detail throughout this volume. Neither do I contend that black women writers are unique in shaping the critical context in which their writing would be received. To do so would ignore the roles played by Henry James, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf and Ralph Ellison in the critical reception of modernism, to take just one historical case. Still, the African American women who came into print during the last quarter of the twentieth century reflected on their artistic

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and Empire, 1885–1930 . London: Continuum International Publishing Group. Chrisman, Laura. 2000. Rereading the Imperial Romance: British Imperialism and South African Resistance in Haggard, Schreiner, and Plaatje . Oxford: Clarendon Press. —— 2003. Postcolonial Contraventions: Cultural Readings of Race, Imperialism and Transnationalism . Manchester: Manchester University Press. —— 2012. ‘The Imperial Romance’. In David Attwell and Derek Attridge, eds, The Cambridge History of South African Literature , pp. 226–245. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Clark

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african americans of ways to properly conduct themselves during a police encounter so as not to get killed. They perpetuate society’s impropriety of placing the onus for staying alive on the potential victim, as opposed to holding a corrupt and racist system, maintained by corrupt and racist officers, accountable for their abhorrent actions. This is equivalent to telling women how to conduct themselves so as not to get raped, as opposed to holding rapists accountable for their heinous violence against women. C h a p t e r 1 9 When the Church Sins The Violence of

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and Zora Neale Hurston are possible, as well as those by recent playwrights like August Wilson and George C. Wolfe. III During his tenure as Director for the Center for African and African-American Studies at the Atlanta (now Clark Atlanta) University, in a series of discussions entitled, "Africa and America: Essays in Afro-American Culture," Long presented his conceptualization of Black Core values. For our purposes here we will draw from two within the series. The first, "The African Continuum: From the Black Core," puts forth the paradigm, addressing the

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Heidi (ed.), Rereading Aphra Behn: History, Theory, and Criticism , Charlottesville and London: University Press of Virginia, 1993, pp. 44–62. Nelson Bonnie and Burroghs Catherine (eds), Teaching British Women Playwrights of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century, New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2010. ← 172 | 173 → O’Donnell Mary Ann, “Myth and Mythmaking: in the Works of Aphra Behn”, in O’Donnell Mary Ann, Dhuicq Bernard, and Leduc Guyonne (eds), Aphra Behn (1640–1689): Identity, Alterity, Ambiguity , Paris: L’Harmattan, 2000, pp. 101