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Edited by Axel Grimm

Die Didaktik der beruflichen Fachrichtung Informationstechnik/Informatik steht historisch, berufswissenschaftlich und ordnungspolitisch in einem Spannungsverhältnis. Eine auch nur in Ansätzen geschlossene Theoriebildung zu einer Didaktik der Informationstechnik liegt nicht vor. Ausgehend von diesem Desiderat soll mit dieser Veröffentlichung eine erste Lücke geschlossen werden. Ziel dieses Buches ist es, Gegenstandsbereiche vorzustellen, die für eine Theoriebildung einer Didaktik der beruflichen Fachrichtung Informationstechnik/Informatik von Bedeutung sind. Dazu sind Beiträge eingeholt worden, die eine theoretische Einordnung auf verschiedenen Analyseebenen ermöglichen. Band 1 „Theoriebildung" schafft somit ein erstes Fundament, das im Weiteren ausgebaut werden wird. Ziel ist es, der beruflichen Fachrichtung Informationstechnik/Informatik und deren Didaktik ein eigenständiges Profil zu geben, damit sie sich gegenüber dem Status quo emanzipieren kann.

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Edited by Amber E. George and Russell Waltz

This book presents educational strategies for combating the harmful effects of hegemonic masculinity in the college classroom. The critical pedagogy presented in this book challenge some of the heteronormative tendencies present in the fields of media studies, literature studies, linguistic studies, and critical thinking.

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Saeed Nazari

In banking education where the focus of curriculum is producing legitimate knowledge to maintain the sociocultural arrangements, the subjectivity of students and teachers is simply taken for granted. Once credentialized, students can find the source of unease within as public education—centered on conformity and competition—has overlooked their individuality. To contribute to their self-understanding and self-love, self-education starts from reconstructing student and teacher educational experiences. Once students and teachers reflect on their educational experience using autobiographical writing, they can reconstruct their understanding of their self and their education. Using emancipatory and transformative writing to liberate self through autobiographical method of Currere, this book takes a psychoanalytical and hermeneutic journey into student and teacher inner world. Once false self gets shattered following the synthetic phase of the method, students and teachers can reconnect to their true self disguised by non-ego—curriculum. As the source of aesthetic creation and inspiration, true self will connect students and teachers to their deeper layers of self-understanding and self-value using which they can recreate their lifeworlds and reconstruct their social and political spheres. Using hermeneutic dialogue following their rebirth, students and teachers will transfer their transformative and liberating understanding of lifeworld to their circumstances to reconstruct education.

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The Expanding Universe of Writing Studies

Higher Education Writing Research

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Edited by Kelly Blewett, Tiane Donahue and Cynthia Monroe

This edited collection arrives at a crucial moment in the evolution of Writing Studies research. It brings together well-known and emerging scholars in the field of Writing Studies, broadly defined, to explore the range of research methods and methodologies, the types of research questions asked, and the types of data in play in research about higher education writing in the 21st century. Its contribution is unique in the current landscape—a collection of carefully detailed descriptions of the research methods that constitute the field today, after fifty years of development—as marked by the 50th anniversary of the 1966 Dartmouth Seminar. The chapters focus on writing and writers in higher education, foregrounding research questions, methods, and data, while defining the areas of research that constitute this interdisciplinary field and offering examples of studies that employ the methods in these areas. Initial chapters address broad questions: the state of the field today, with a special focus on the field’s methods and their (inter)disciplinary history. Contributions then cover domains such as sociological ethnography, cultural-historical activity theory, linguistics, decolonial translation, cognitive science, corpus linguistics in the study of writing in university first year and upper-level contexts, recurring features in writing across academic contexts, work from psychologists studying college writers’ neuroplasticity, and many other domains of writing research. The final chapter argues for the value of lifespan writing research as an emerging domain, while the conclusion presents a synthesis of the major themes of the collection from leading scholars in the field.

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Susan K. Brondyk and Nancy L. Cook

Changing people’s practice is difficult, shifting the culture of an organization even more so. This book is a description of how one education preparation program did both. This is the story of how they transformed their student teaching program, creating tools and structures that resulted in mentors and student teachers working together in new ways. At the heart of their model is an assessment tool—STAT, for short—used to track the growth and development of student teachers and guide conversations between the college supervisor, cooperating teacher and student teacher. Although this book describes Hope College’s new student teaching model it is really about change. This story takes the reader through the complex change process of one institution, examining the loosely coupled dynamic between leaders and individuals. It describes the natural tension between support and autonomy as program leaders walk alongside individuals as they enact a new practice. This book is intended for teacher educators interested in a developmental model of mentor support, but also for those faced with the daunting task of making changes in their own program. There are lessons learned, however, that go beyond teacher preparation and may serve as a catalyst for others as they engage in their own change process.

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Preserving Emotion in Student Writing

Innovation in Composition Pedagogy

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Edited by Craig Wynne

The student-instructor dynamic has become more complex in recent years. Writing instructors, in particular, see the vulnerabilities expressed by students in their writing. This book provides a wide variety of theories and techniques for writing teachers on the integration of emotion into writing instruction. Current writing instructors, as well as students of the craft, can benefit from the ideas and strategies offered by a variety of practitioners in the field. This book includes offerings, such as theories in development, empirical studies, and lesson plans designed to benefit writing instructors and their students.

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Learning to Disclose

A Journey of Transracial Adoption

Joni Schwartz and Rebecca Schwartz

Joni and Rebecca Schwartz in their collaborative autoethnography, Learning to Disclose: A Journey of Transracial Adoption, are doing soul work. This adult white mother and black daughter reflect and dialogue around the places and histories that shaped their relationship. Through three voices: the voice of critical history, the daughter and the mother, the co-authors excavate the past to see if and how it lives in their present. In an intriguing mix of critical history of places like Port-au-Prince and Gulu, Uganda as well as lesser-known narratives of W.E.B. Dubois, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, and Shirley Chisholm, the co-authors tell their own personal and moving stories of becoming mother and daughter engaging such topics as racial identity, disclosure, racial appropriation, colonialism, and the complex history of transracial adoption.

For anyone interested in racial identity in the complex world of blended families and adult mother and daughter relationships, this is a must read. This book is ideal for all humanities courses across disciplines from sociology, education, qualitative research, and social work to race and communication studies. In this era of strained and confusing racial dialogue, this book is refreshing in its honesty, moving it its personal narratives, and instructive in its engagement in how the historical lives in the social imagination of our present lives and relationships.

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Policing Black Athletes

Racial Disconnect in Sports

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Vernon L. Andrews

"Why isn't sport played the way it used to be played, when football was for men who loved America, who saluted the flag, and who respected our men in blue and our troops by standing—and not kneeling—for our National Anthem!" This sentiment permeates American football today, and represents the feelings of many fans who can appreciate their Black heroes, but find the issue of "Blackness" via the two extremes of celebratory expression and protest, regressive. "This should be about sport, not politics," many feel. I concur. I wish the sporting arena didn't have to be the last battlefield for Civil Rights. But here we are.  This book explores how conflicts over diversity, culture, inclusion, exclusion, protest and control have been played out over the twentieth century in various sports and institutions, and what lessons we can learn from our overlapping—though at times, separate—cultural histories of Black and White. This book is about how we learn to act when out in public...and when playing sport. Infused in this discussion is the ever-present policing of Black bodies in sport and society, and the disconnect we have as citizens living in the same country perpetually divided by race.

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Justin B. Hopkins

Autoethnography in Undergraduate Writing Courses blends narrative and analysis in an engaging and applicable account of how the genre of autoethnography can be a valuable addition or alternative to traditional research assignments.

Many writing teachers struggle to motivate and equip students to conduct meaningful and effective research. Practicing autoethnography—the scholarly combination of personal reflection, artistic representation, and social/cultural research—provides an opportunity for students to research and write about something that genuinely interests them: their own experiences.

A genre of personal writing, autoethnography is comparable to pedagogy pioneered by expressivists like Donald Murray, Peter Elbow, and Wendy Bishop, among others. However, combining personal writing with research—as autoethnography does—is more rare. Some compositionists have already used autoethnography in their own research and teaching, but this book demonstrates why more compositionists should consider adopting autoethnography into their pedagogy.

The author shares his own experience teaching autoethnography at the undergraduate level, modeling its potential and demonstrating its impact. Written in a lively, conversational voice, the book presents substantial qualitative research, including samples of student writing, supplemented by student interviews and surveys.

These data indicate that practicing autoethnography can have unusually, if not uniquely, positive effects on students’ lives. Specifically, the author identifies and illustrates eight outcomes of practicing autoethnography: increased reflexivity, improved research and writing skills, greater awareness of ethical issues, critical empowerment, therapeutic catharsis, enjoyment, and the development of a sense of community.

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Ellen P. McShane

Conquering Trauma and Anxiety to Find Happiness offers trauma victims suffering from anxiety and other disorders freedom from continued emotional suffering. National mental health statistics state 60% of adults, approximately 150,000,000 people, report experiencing trauma. The National Institute of Mental health states 42,000,000 American adults live with an anxiety disorder often resulting from trauma. Through this book’s focus on affect theory and affect labeling, these millions of traumatized and anxious individuals learn to stop living with chronic stress and their reactive, inflexible, and rigid responses to life.

This book offers affect theory as a biological explanation to the consequences of living as a trauma victim by understanding what happened to them and repairing the harm. Affect theory presents nine biologically-coded affects to explain emotion, motivation, behavior, and personality with two positive, one neutral, and six negative affects. Stimulus from our environment activates an affect and its preprogrammed responses within our brain and body. Through facial expressions, along with other physical manifestations, we understand when an affect activates to help us understand our feelings.

Another intervention featured in this book, affect labeling or putting feelings into words, encourages us to focus attention in the present moment to read our body’s sensory information and integrate our brain and mind. Trauma victims understand how therapy provides an important intervention for recovery. An affect management system offers various interventions, such as diet and exercise, to overcome the consequences of trauma and anxiety. We no longer need to suffer if we experience trauma and anxiety.