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Home with Hip Hop Feminism

Performances in Communication and Culture

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Aisha S. Durham

This book has won the 2015 Top Book Award from the NCA African American Communication and Culture Division (AACCD) of NCA

Home with Hip Hop Feminism brings together popular culture and the everyday experiences of black women from the hip hop generation to highlight the epiphanic moments when the imagined and real body converge or collide.
To date, there are no books devoted exclusively to black women that integrate performance auto/ethnography and media studies from a hip hop feminist perspective. This book serves as a three-sided intervention against a textually dominated feminist media studies, a white-centered feminist third wave theory, and a masculinist hip hop cultural project. Aisha S. Durham not only reclaims her voice in these three spaces, she also rewrites her hip hop history by returning to the intellectual, cultural, and physical places she calls home.
The book will appeal to undergraduate and graduate students interested in media and cultural studies, race and ethnic studies, and gender and sexuality studies.
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Globalizing Cultural Studies

Ethnographic Interventions in Theory, Method, and Policy

Cameron McCarthy, Aisha S. Durham, Laura C. Engel and Alice A. Filmer

The contributors to Globalizing Cultural Studies: Ethnographic Interventions in Theory, Method, and Policy take as their central topic the problematic status of «the global» within cultural studies in the areas of theory, method, and policy, and particularly in relation to the intersections of language, power, and identity in twenty-first century, post-9/11 culture(s). Writing against the Anglo-centric ethnographic gaze that has saturated various cultural studies projects to date, contributors offer new interdisciplinary, autobiographical, ethnographic, textual, postcolonial, poststructural, and political economic approaches to the practice of cultural studies. This edited volume foregrounds twenty-five groundbreaking essays (plus a provocative foreword and an insightful afterword) in which the authors show how globalization is articulated in the micro and macro dimensions of contemporary life, pointing to the need for cultural studies to be more systematically engaged with the multiplicity and difference that globalization has proffered.