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  • All: Trust and Virtual Worlds. contemporary Perspectives x
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experi- ences of women travellers. Perhaps one of the most important and somewhat unexpected out- comes of this investigation is a recognition of the vital importance of travel writers and filmmakers in opening up textual spaces which bring to readers and spectators different perspectives on what is happening in the world and thus enable reflection and potential change. Schulze suggests that the contemporary writer (and filmmaker) through a keen cultural awareness, intense contact with the everyday citizens and a propensity toward a high volume of reading, is

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theoretical perspectives in Film Studies. While film ‘does not operate as a trustworthy representation of cultures, places or people’, and should not be ‘trusted as the guarantor of truth’, it can still be credited with an excep- tional power in creating ‘the diverse and dif fuse experiences of the condi- tions of capital rather than knowledge of it.’ By introducing ‘experience’ as a central category, Harbord seems to of fer a small foothold for concrete and specific aspects of the real in Film Theory, even if – in a characteristic gesture – she opts for a strangely

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V. England Anja Tschörtner (Oxford) “I want to be a munitionette!” – The Depiction of Young Women’s War Work in British and German Popular Fiction for Girls in the First World War This article discusses and compares the depiction of young women’s work for the war ef- fort in German and British popular fiction for girls published during the First World War. Looking at British examples taken from novels by Bessie Marchant, Angela Brazil, and Brenda Girvin, and at German fiction by Sophie Kloerss, Else Hofmann, and Charlotte Niese, the motivation of the

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of generosity, but simply because his disposition and his type of talent drive him to do so, then I believe that he bears a responsibility for whatever the world delivers as a response to his work.’59 At other times Hesse was shamed into an epistolary response: ‘They [his readers] are very touching for me and their trust shames me’,60 or he was piqued into a more formulaic response which he often satisfied by sending pre- printed literary materials: ‘Thus, I don’t like to leave the letters without a response and, since in almost all cases I cannot respond in

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idea of Königsberg- Kaliningrad as a destination for biographical tourism (a more general form than ‘literary tourism’) had a sort of virtual afterlife in literary and artistic works after 1945, predicated on the loss of ‘Kant and Königsberg’ from Germany’s domestic cultural geography. ‘Kant and Königsberg’ therefore has specific meanings and con- tinued relevance as a site of memory, although its ‘power’ depends heavily on the importance you attribute to Kant. Simultaneously, these chapters highlight the paradox of works that lack direct referentiality

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drawing some connections between a prominent German national memorial, the Kollwitz Pietà at Berlin’s ‘Neue Wache’, and the story of the downfall of Königsberg- Kaliningrad, as an increasingly invis- ible part of the national narrative of contemporary Germany. It described the biographical and thematic links between Kollwitz, her work, and Königsberg, as well as giving a summary of the city’s experience during the Second World War and its aftermath. I made the suggestion that even an apparently unrelated memorial such as the Pietà has numerous links to Königsberg

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“disfigured” bodies. What were conceived of by the original artists as experiments in perspective were now presented as attempts by “degenerate minds” at a literal transcription of reality, as if the Cubists actually saw the real world in terms of cubes. The work of artists of the rank of Otto Dix, Max Beckmann and Paul Klee was displayed in a clustered and confusing way, and exhibited to the public under rubrics such as “The insolent Mockery of the Divine”, “Revelation of the Jewish racial Soul”, “An Insult to German Womanhood”, “The intellectual Cretin and

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Chapter 2 Lovers: The Search for and Failure of Intimacy in Berlin Literature In the late 1990s, seeking to identify the malaise of the millennium, the media and literary scholars centred their discussions of contemporary German literature on the alienation of modern life. Although anonym- ity and isolation within urban centres has long been a topic of concern, it was revived here as indicative of the party generation, the ‘scenesters’, the young Germans who seemed to have no jobs, no motivation, noth- ing to do and nothing to care about. Deemed worse than

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what the socialist problem novel should accomplish, which is also useful for a dis- cussion of proletarian autobiography: Thus the socialist problem novel in my opinion fully carries out its mission if by a faithful portrayal of the real relations it dispels the dominant conventional illu- sions concerning these relations, shakes the optimism of the bourgeois world, and inevitably instills doubt as to the eternal validity of that which exists, without itself of fering a direct solution of the problem involved, even without at times ostensibly taking sides. (268

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investigation is a recognition of the vital importance of travel writers and filmmakers in opening up textual spaces which bring to readers and spectators different perspectives on what is happening in the world and thus enable reflection and potential change. Schulze suggests that the contemporary writer (and filmmaker) through a keen cultural awareness, intense contact with the everyday citizens and a propensity toward a high volume of reading, is well positioned to help reinvigorate ← 217 | 218 → critical thought and voice the concerns of normal citizens, as against